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TCKs don’t do ‘favourite places’

Growing up as a globally mobile kid, I occasionally felt bullied into defining my international identity in ways that made me uncomfortable. This happened, for example, when people insisted I give them an answer to the question, “So of all the places you’ve lived, what’s your favourite?” If people who don’t move have one favourite place, shouldn’t I have one too? But we don’t. Global nomads know that because we...

What if living abroad is the norm?: Framing our re...

In her blog “The effects of monolingualism” Madalena Cruz-Ferreira reflects on how the debate starts from the point of view that monolingualism is the norm making its ‘opposite’, multilingualism, an aberration. (http://beingmultilingual.blogspot.fr/2011/07/effects-of-monolingualism.html) From this paradigm, research asks ‘what are the effects of multilingualism on language development?’ But, says Cruz-Ferreira,...

International childhoods: a 21st century approach ...

“It wasn’t that long ago that little thought was given to the long-term effects of uprooting children at such crucial stages in their development, but research now proves there is a need to adequately prepare youngsters for what can be an intensely distressing and unsettling experience.” I took this quote from the Amazon review of a book designed to support young children to move abroad. I haven’t read the book so...
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