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International childhoods: a 21st century approach ...

“It wasn’t that long ago that little thought was given to the long-term effects of uprooting children at such crucial stages in their development, but research now proves there is a need to adequately prepare youngsters for what can be an intensely distressing and unsettling experience.” I took this quote from the Amazon review of a book designed to support young children to move abroad. I haven’t read the book so...

Different worlds

In economy class on our Virgin Airlines flight to London, our knees knocked against the seat before us. In the middle column of the plane, my daughter had the isle seat to my left, and I prayed that the seat to my right would remain empty. It wasn’t to be. A short, well-rounded Nigerian woman in black trousers and a black, thickly padded winter coat edged towards our row. The young Nigerian lady in the isle seat stood up to...

Deciding to move?

Making Decisions By Michele Bos   What I really want to do is Something I’m quite sure about To leave this country as it is Never to return, just rushing out.   Something I’m quite sure about: How sad I’d be to leave Never to return, just rushing out Would leave longing to retrieve.   How sad I’d be to leave An opportunity untaken As it would leave longing to retrieve Is it possible to remain...

Back to what really counts

I’m back in Europe now, talking to old friends, catching up on their news, their activities in the past 12 months. It’s given me the chance to reflect on what it is, exactly, that I like so much about my life in Lagos. I can now safely sum it up in one word: people. Life in Lagos has been, for me, about getting back to basics, to what is really important – to the time and energy you put into relationships and the energy...

Teenage managers

There are no management books that deal with the particular issues teenagers face when dealing with household staff. While in Nigeria, our kids are learning such people-management skills through trial and error as they deal with our driver, Efe, and our security man, Osagie. For those of you who don’t live in Nigeria, the idea of having a driver and personal bodyguard (who sits in the front passenger seat) probably sounds...
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