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Arik Air’s WINGS Magazine turns 5

In the Southern Sun Hotel in the residential island of Ikoyi in Lagos, WINGS Magazine held a reception to celebrate the 5th year existence of an excellent product. WINGS Magazine is important for two reasons: 1. It raises the bar for quality in-flight magazines. It is the sort of magazine that everyone reads when on an Arik flight, and then takes home in order to save. Those who haven’t flown on Arik that quarter beg...

The way we see things

“The way we see things is the way WE see things; it may not be the way things are.” This quote is from H B Gelatt from his blog Positive Uncertainty: a philosophy of decision-making in uncertain times. For people who live in a country other than their birth or passport country, we are faced with interpreting what we see all the time. What we ‘see’ of the local people is their behaviour, their customs, communication...

Is your glass half empty? Get a telescope

Watching Dutch news the other night there was a segment that went something like: There was a significant decrease in the number of holidays taken by Dutch people this year because of the financial crisis… The news presenter went on to give statistics on the decrease in flights and lower revenue in the tourism industry. This holiday season people are having to forgo travel and holiday plans; the belt tightening continues....

Book Launch

On Saturday 12 May, I launched my latest book, Culture Smart! Nigeria. The event took place at the Lifehouse in Lagos, a centre of culture, reflection and support for all forms of artistic expression. The official part of the afternoon took place in the lovely garden, under a tree, as every important business should be traditionally conducted Africa. Nigeria is not a tourist destination and yet many foreigners come here for...

One woman who made a difference

There was a two-page spread in a Dutch newspaper the other week on a father and son’s decades worth of development experience in Africa. Looking back, they felt that their years of diligent work and best intentions had had very little lasting impact on pulling people out of poverty in the communities where they had worked. The article needs to be understood within the context of a raging political debate on development aid...

Lessons from Nigeria’s emancipated women

In marriage, Yoruba women (the predominant ethnic group in Nigeria’s southwest where Lagos is) are more emancipated than women in the west. I use the term ‘emancipation’ here in terms of the ‘goal’ of many western feminists that women should be financially independent and self-reliant. Nigerian women, by tradition and cultural practice are expected to work in order to provide for their own needs; the husband...
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